Microbiology

The Clinical Microbiology unit has a multidisciplinary function. Their main activity consists of diagnosing infectious diseases by demonstrating the agent causing these infections in the biological samples collected from the patient. Techniques like antigen detection, staining or direct display provide quick diagnosis. The cultivation and identification of germs, along with an anti-biogram, makes it possible to know their sensitivity or resistance to anti-microbial agents and thereby find the most appropriate treatment, with greater therapeutic success.

Meanwhile, this Unit is also responsible for microbiological tests on hospital areas and the isolation of pathogenic germs in those handling food.

Another of its basic functions consists of providing advice to patients, doctors and hospital institutions on all aspects - both clinical and epidemiological - included in its area of expertise.

AUTOMATED IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM (MALDI-TOF MASS SPECTROMETRY)

AUTOMATED ANTIBIOGRAM SYSTEM

AUTOMATED HAEMOCULTURE SYSTEM

BACTERIOLOGY

Bacterial cultures
Helicobacter pylori culture
Multi-resistant germ detection study
Study of carriers (food handlers, etc.)
Gram stain
India ink stain

MYCOLOGY

KOH (direct view)
Cultivation of fungi (skin, hair, nails ...)

MYCOBACTERIA

Liquid medium culture (Automated system)
Solid medium culture (Lowenstein-Jensen)
Zhiel-Neelsen stain

PARASITOLOGY

Identification of human parasites (faeces, urine, hair, skin, etc.)
Culturing of parasites (acanthamoeba, leishmania)
Giemsa staining

DETECTION OF ANTIGENS AND TOXINS

Helicobacter pylori
Clostridium difficile
Clostridium perfringens
Legionella
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A)
Rotavirus
Adenovirus
Astrovirus

BLOOD IN FAECES

Benzidine test
Immunochromatic test (monoclonal antibodies)

DIGESTION IN FAECES

CLINICAL STUDIES

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL MONITORING IN ASSOCIATED CENTRES